Every 28 Hours One-Minute Play Festival

Phase One Oct 20-24, St. Louis County

A Real Life Superhero

Bree Newsome became an Internet and media sensation when she did what many were longing to do but didn’t dare. She scaled a flagpole outside South Carolina's statehouse and brought the flag down, while police officers waited to arrest her below.

Every 28 Hours One-Minute Play Festival

Coming soon across the nation! Oct 20-24!

What is The Ferguson Moment?

We call on artists across the nation to share their responses to the oppression, violence, and resistance to racially motivated police brutality

Resources

Marcia Chatelain, an assistant professor in the Department of History, created the #FergusonSyllabus in response to recent events in Ferguson, Missouri.

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

125th and Freedom

Artistic Call to Action at Judson Memorial Church



125th and Freedom is a durational, processional, performance ritual that explores the intersection of prison system, displacement, and environmental racism. Additionally, the piece re-imagines historic 125th street as Harriet Tubman's Underground Railroad to a world with out the systemic mass incarceration or the extermination of black and brown people, globally.

The ensemble consists of: Kimani Fowlin, Audrey Hailes, David J. Cork, Jason C. Brown, and Donnell E. Smith.

Original writing by: Aurin Squire and Ebony Noelle Golden
Choreography and Direction by: Ebony Noelle Golden

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

THEHYPEISDEAD - TO THE LOST SOULS OF 2015

No charges for Sandra Bland's death, no charges for Tamir Rice's death?
'To the lost souls of 2015' Art by @thehypeisdead via Ferguson in Paris ‪#‎BlackLivesMatter‬


Photographer/Painter: TheHypeIsDead
Model: Millie G

VIA--> http://www.afropunk.com/photo/thehypeisdead-to-the-lost-souls-of-2015

Why are there no staff black cartoonists at a time when we need them most?


"Knight has been drawing comics about police brutality and bias for nearly a quarter-century, since the 1992 Rodney King riots, and as the visual commentator likes to note, he was spoofing the racism he witnessed well before he began lampooning presidents. But in some ways, it is only more recently than some audiences have truly caught up to Knight and the realities he renders in his new cartoon slide show, “They Shoot Black People, Don’t They?” Given the coverage that police shootings from Los Angeles to Ferguson to Cleveland to the Carolinas now garner in a world of smartphone cameras and social media, many readers laugh at Knight’s cartoons because they are finally fully cognizant of the context — and because they realize that his satiric bull’s-eyes are painted uncomfortably close to the truth." 
 By Michael Cavna December 29, 2015

Read More here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/comic-riffs/wp/2015/12/29/in-a-tamir-rice-era-why-are-there-no-staff-black-cartoonists-to-comment/

Saturday, December 19, 2015

Embodiment Project Presents: Chalk Outlines

Embodiment Project presents: Chalk Outlines

Featuring:
Embodiment Project
Global Street Dance Masquerade with Rashad AKA Soul Nubian
NAKA Dance Theater

Chalk Oultines combines street dance, live song by Valerie Troutt's MoonCandy, and documentary theater to bring critical voices from our community to the center of a timely conversation about race equity, solidarity, and strength.

This show will also feature work by the profound artist, Tigre Bailando. He is Bay Areas best kept secret...

https://vimeo.com/147283922

Saturday December 19, 8pm
Sunday December 20 8pm
FREE
Destiny Arts Center
970 Grace Ave, Oakland, California

Saturday, October 31, 2015

Curt Columbus: Trinity play is not 'anti-police'

Trinity play is not 'anti-police' By Curt Columbus, the Richard L. Bready Artistic Director of Trinity Repertory Company.

Last Monday night, Trinity Rep produced the world-premiere production of "Every 28 Hours," a series of one-minute plays written by actors and playwrights from around the country in response to the rash of police shootings of unarmed black men over the past year.

Produced with the help of The One-Minute Play Festival and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, the plays were written by men and women of all races and backgrounds following a week-long residency in Ferguson, Mo., where the shooting death of Michael Brown by a police officer ignited a storm of protest and anger, as well as a national conversation about race that has continued to this day. "Every 28 Hours" was written in dialogue with members of the Ferguson community, including the Ferguson police, and is a reflection of this country's current civil rights movement, as well as the events that have inspired the Black Lives Matter movement.

The night was a beautiful, profoundly moving success, and perhaps one of the finest nights of theater we have staged. Spearheaded by Joe Wilson Jr., one of Trinity Rep's acting company members who took part in the Ferguson residency and wrote one of the plays, the production featured more than 80 local actors of all ages and races who volunteered their time and talent performing to a sold-out house. The one-minute plays themselves were by turn beautiful and ugly, angry and optimistic, funny and tragic, mournful and joyous. Without a particular political viewpoint, they managed to reflect a country still grappling with race — celebrating the past victories of the civil rights movement while also pointing ahead to the work that still needs to be done.

However, there are some (who didn't attend the show but rather heard about it through a Providence Journal article) who are upset that Trinity Rep decided to produce "Every 28 Hours." We have even had a few subscribers and donors revoke their support of the theater. Many of the detractors indicated they feel that by producing this play, we are anti-police. That could not be further from the truth. The Providence Police Department has helped Trinity Rep in innumerable ways for decades. Just this past summer, the Providence police sent a few officers over to the theater to make sure our young students were dismissed safely at the end of the day. They are a vital part of this community, and we honor and respect their service and professionalism.

Theater is, by its very nature, a political act. It can and should be provocative as well as entertaining. It also serves a critical role by bringing a community together to reflect on the issues of our time. "Every 28 Hours" captures history in the making, as our country grapples with a changing racial demographic; with police officer training and the role of guns in our society; and with the mass incarceration of a large segment of our society. No matter where you stand, there is no debating that these are important issues to ponder and discuss. What better place for our community to come together peacefully to reflect on these topics than at the state theater of Rhode Island?

read more here: http://www.providencejournal.com/article/20151031/OPINION/151039891

Thursday, October 29, 2015

Trinity Repertory Company Performs Every 28 Hours, A One-Minute Play Festival

Trinity Repertory Company Performs Every 28 Hours, A One-Minute Play Festival by Wendy Jane

The anticipation of the packed audience, young and old, black, white, and brown, in the intimate Dowling Theater at Trinity Rep was in the air, as the Extraordinary Rendition Band–a street band open to all,with a mission to bring attention to selected causes, paraded onto the stage–drums, brass and percussion, and rag-tag red outfits in full glory. After a softly sung We Shall Overcome, a young woman from the band spoke while the band continued to play. She spoke of the injustices that this audience seemed sadly all too well aware of–the killings of far too many young, unarmed, black men and women, mostly at the hands of police officers.

After the band finished, Joe Wilson, Jr., actor and playwright with Trinity Rep, stepped onstage. Mr. Wilson shared with us, that despite the hateful comments that appeared on social media regarding the announcement of the local Every 28 Hours performance, the show was being held, and that this very action “is how we move things forward, with art and love, and theater.” We learned that Wilson was a part of a group of actors and playwrights from around the country who visited Ferguson, Missouri last week to meet with the One-Minute Play Festival group, learn the methodology of going out into the community to gather stories, create plays and then take the plays back to their own communities. Yet, Trinity Rep is the only theater doing the show this week, while most other groups will premiere the Every 28 Hours One-Minute Play Festival some time next year.

Wilson further explained how he and the other artists met with community leaders, residents, the faith community, and the school that Michael Brown attended to learn about how the events of Ferguson have impacted individuals, and their community. There were many interviews culled, but Wilson noted that the interviewers were not allowed to take notes, but to connect more intimately through conversation. Conducting the interview in pairs, Wilson said, allowed one artist to catch something said, or a certain mannerism that the other might have missed. Writing solely from inspiration derived from these connections, the artists gathered to write their plays–all of this taking place in one short week.

Wilson’s passion shined brightly as he spoke, and he became emotional when he dedicated this show’s performance to Dr. Barbara Meek, a long-time company member of Trinity Rep, a woman Wilson said taught him how to be inquisitive, and whom he loved dearly.

As we braced ourselves for the eighty, one-minute plays that we were about to witness–plays written by playwrights and actors from near and far, and acted by scores of actors, as well as students from all over the city–Wilson asked us to consider “every minute as a heartbeat, a snapshot of the world..” and that with each snapshot, we hear a different story, and get a more inclusive, better picture of the world we live in.

read more here: http://wendyjanegrossman.com/2015/10/29/trinity-repertory-theater-performs-every-28-hours-at-one-minute-play-festival/

Wednesday, October 28, 2015

A.C.T. Stage Coach Presents: Every 28 Hours

A.C.T. Stage Coach Presents: Every 28 Hours: An Investigation of the Events in Ferguson, Missouri, and Black Lives in America


After a week-long residency in St. Louis, Missouri, A.C.T. Stage Coach will host a reading of new plays developed during phase one of the Every 28 Hours project. This project was created through a partnership between Oregon Shakespeare Festival and the One-Minute Play Festival. Our FREE event is part of phase two of the project: a national call to action involving simultaneous performances at theater companies around the country.

Join us for an evening of new work exploring this current moment for civil rights and racial justice in America. This event will include audience engagement activities before and after the performance and will feature guest appearances by local artists and activists. Check back for more details soon!

For more information and to reserve your free tickets, please email stagecoach@act-sf.org. 
Seating is limited.
When: Wednesday, October 28 at 7 p.m. (doors open at 6:30)
Where: The Rueff at A.C.T.'s Strand Theater | 1127 Market Street, San Francisco

For more information about Every 28 Hours:
https://www.facebook.com/Every28HoursPlays?fref=ts

For more information about A.C.T. Stage Coach: http://www.actsf.org/home/education/stagecoach.html

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Joe Wilson Jr. and Every 28 Hours at Trinity Repertory Company

Joe Wilson Jr. and Every 28 Hours at Trinity Repertory Company
by ERIN X. SMITHERS in ON SET WITH ERIN




Visit to see more photos: http://followthesoultrane.com/2015/10/joe-wilson-jr-and-every-28-hours-at-trinity-repertory-company/

Monday, October 26, 2015

Trinity Rep using minute-long plays to explore police shootings of blacks

Trinity Rep using minute-long plays to explore police shootings of blacks
"We're working to bring attention to the systematic killing of people of color by the police."
By Channing Gray 
Journal Arts Writer

Photo from Erin X Smithers

Not one to shy away from the tough issues of the times, Trinity Repertory Company is staging a free festival of minute-long plays Monday night that deal with the rash of police shootings that have left young black men dead. Last week, writers and theater people from across the country gathered in St. Louis to pen dozens of mini-dramas inspired by the events last year in neighboring Ferguson, where violence erupted after the police shooting death of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teen.

The plays, which could number as many as 90, were to be performed over the weekend in St. Louis and Ferguson before heading to stages in San Francisco and Providence, one of the first cities to take part in this extensive national project.

Related content Gamm, 2nd Story plays delve into racial unrest"We're working to bring attention to the systematic killing of people of color by the police," said Kate Kataja, one of the producers of Monday night's festival. "It's a response to people of color being killed with regularity that is unacceptable."

One of the playwrights who spent last week in St. Louis is Trinity actor Joe Wilson Jr., who is working on his own play about jazz great Billy Strayhorn. Wilson spent time talking with students in Brown's high school, and was given 12 hours to write a play about a game the students played to help them cope with Brown's death.

read more here http://www.providencejournal.com/article/20151026/NEWS/151029506

Mini-plays roused by Ferguson come to Providence

Mini-plays roused by Ferguson come to Providence By Alana Cerrone 

Wilson was part of a group of playwrights that went to Ferguson to listen to the community's stories. "We too in this community could stand to have a hard discussion about race." That's the goal of the Every 28 Hours One-Minute Play Festival - a nationwide project that's debuting at Trinity Rep. “Some of us were inspired by our conversations with students, community leaders, police officers were involved..." The project is based on the contested statistic that says every 28 hours, a person of color is killed by police. "We want to provide as many viewpoints as possible, and as many snapshots as possible." Those snapshots of Ferguson are now coming to Providence, in the form of 1-minute plays. So far, the reception hasn't been all positive. Trinity Rep’s Artistic Director Curt Columbus says, "you can't imagine the phone calls and emails I've gotten from people." Critics are worried that the plays will be one-sided, but organizers are hopeful. "The purpose of tonight is not division…the purpose of tonight is to have a conversation about something that's incredibly important."

read more here: http://www.abc6.com/story/30354956/mini-plays-roused-by-ferguson-come-to-providence

Saturday, October 24, 2015

Every 28 Hours: Creating a Performance for Ferguson

Ferguson’s Aftermath: Art and Unity in light of Mike Brown- Joe Wilson, Jr.

My time spent in Ferguson has been an unforgettable moment in my life. I have met some of the most generous and extraordinary people of diverse races, creeds, and socio-economic backgrounds. These individuals share a common belief that what happened on August 9, 2014, was an egregious travesty of justice, and an absence of common decency and humanity. An unarmed, African-American teenager was shot by a police officer. His dead, uncovered body was left in the middle of a street in his neighborhood as both young and old stared in disbelief. Michael Brown’s mother pleaded to make contact with her dead son. Yet, for four hours, she watched his body bleed onto the ground on a hot, summer day. After his body was finally removed, Mike Brown's blood was baked into the hot asphalt, making it impossible to wash away. The city had to literally remove the blood soaked pavement from the street! This place still and will forever exist as a memorial to this young man. Flowers and teddy bears rest within the narrow, empty sliver of concrete where this young man’s blood ran.

Some community members I met on this trip immediately assembled to bear witness to what was happening in Ferguson. Many of these folks were artists who came armed with art supplies. They administered council to community youth by providing them with sketch paper and markers, hoping to offer children with ways to cope with this traumatic scene. I heard about a very young child around the age of three who wrote the word “Justice,” but with the “J” spelled backwards. I thought: “out of the mouths of babes,” as the old folks would say. Here was a child who had been to funerals before his first school field trip.

Like Mike Brown’s blood on the hot asphalt, activist art making is “baking into” this political and social justice movement. Artists insert themselves as a critical component of this community’s response to the tragedy. In Ferguson, like so many communities of color, the choice to remain silent is a mode of self-preservation. Preserving the status quo was safer than unleashing their voices of discontent. But artists, civic leaders, concerned citizens, and like-minded police officers are on a quest to seek justice and fundamentally change the conversation from victim blaming to critical, communal self-evaluation. The Ferguson Movement demands accountability by those in power, while creating a space for people to find common ground.

The movement also demands an end to the years of silence that has maintained those in power and the status quo, while acknowledging that the community itself is responsible for creating a culture of silence. Local artists are providing a mechanism for everyone to speak because making art is a process that bears witness to our humanity. Through compassion and imagination, artists provide safe spaces for the purpose of building consensus. Creativity and empathy are slowly helping to create an environment that reflects of the dreams and desires of each and every individual in this region.

- See more at: http://howlround.com/every-28-hours-creating-a-performance-for-ferguson#sthash.AbsCHSgZ.dpuf

Friday, October 23, 2015

Ferguson Events Reverberate at One-Minute Play Festival

Ferguson Events Reverberate at One-Minute Play Festival By JOHN ELIGON NY Times

The “Every 28 Hours” project taps into the integral role that the arts — through songs, paintings, exhibits — have played in helping people to absorb, and protest, what happened in Ferguson — from the killing of Mr. Brown and the unrest that followed to the issues of racial inequality that it raised.

The idea to do a Ferguson-themed production emerged after Claudia Alick, associate producer of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, went to the city after the killing of Mr. Brown in August 2014. She did volunteer work with young people. She met with artists to ask what the community needed. They told her to bear witness to what was going on in Ferguson, she said.

So Ms. Alick created a blog, The Ferguson Moment, that became a bulletin board of sorts for artists to talk about work inspired by the events in Ferguson, where there were huge demonstrations and spasms of looting and vandalism. Then, she said, she thought to go to Mr. D’Andrea, who had approached her years earlier about collaborating.

“It’s a project that’s reflecting on history that’s being made now,” Ms. Alick said.

In the past, the festival drew on writers in a particular community, and they chose their topics; in Chicago, for instance, many focused on gentrification, Mr. D’Andrea said.

read more here
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/24/theater/ferguson-events-reverberate-at-one-minute-play-festival.html

Thursday, October 22, 2015

1-Minute Play Festival Tackles Race, Police Brutality

The TakeAway with John Hockenberry PRODUCED BY: Kristen Meinzer
The show is a co-production of WNYC Radio and Public Radio International, in collaboration with The New York Times and WGBH Boston.


Playwrights from around the country are gathering in Ferguson, Missouri this week to create a series of one-minute plays about police violence and the African-American community. The theater project is called “Every 28 Hours,” which comes from a much talked about and much disputed estimate of police shooting statistics that says a black person is killed by a police bullet every 28 hours. "Every 28 Hours" is being co-produced by the Oregon Shakespeare Festival and New York’s One-Minute Play Festival, in cooperation from many of the nation's top theaters. The "28 Hours" festival, which begins this weekend in St. Louis, is co-produced by Claudia Alick, the associate producer of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival. She discusses the project here. What you'll learn from this segment: How a one minute play can delve into something as serious as police brutality and misconduct. How the festival was designed and how the plays were chosen. What an audience member will see when they attend the festival. Listen to the interview Here

http://www.thetakeaway.org/story/28-hours-fact-and-festival/

Tuesday, October 20, 2015

About Time: "Every 28 Hours" Unites National and Local Theater Artists to Examine Ferguson and #blacklivesmatter

"About Time: "Every 28 Hours" Unites National and Local Theater Artists to Examine Ferguson and #blacklivesmatter"  By Eileen G'Sell, St. Louis Magazine

In October 2014, thousands gathered in downtown St. Louis from around the country to march peacefully in the spirit of “Ferguson October,” one of many ongoing demonstrations responding to the death of Mike Brown, Eric Garner, and other unarmed casualties at the hands of the police. One year later, similar momentum has drawn playwrights, producers, and directors from coast to coast for a different kind of St. Louis demonstration: theatre as direct civic engagement.

Titled Every 28 Hours—referring to the contested statistic that an African American is killed every 28 hours by a member of the police—a host of the country’s most celebrated playhouses are joining forces with local talent in a week-long collaboration culminating in a day of performance Saturday, October 24. Chief among these players are the nationally recognized Oregon Shakespeare Festival (OSF) and New York’s One-Minute-Play Festival (#1MPF), the nation’s largest and longest running grassroots theater festival company. During their week-long residency, participants will tour important area sites and collaborate with St. Louis playwrights, directors, and actors, to create 60 to 90 “one-minute plays” inspired by the exigency and complexity of the #blacklivesmatter movement.

“What we’re hoping to do in St. Louis is to give the country a chance to talk to itself,” says OSF associate producer Claudia Alick. “Some of the collaborators are coming from a pure theater space, some from a very pure activist space, and many are coming from a cross-section of each. Our project is informed by thoughtful leaders in activism, performance, civic leadership, and communications. The work is hard and inspiring and necessary. I’m really glad that the project is going to be birthed in Ferguson.”

Saturday’s premiere in North County promises to be a capital-letter Big Deal for artists and activists alike. #1MPF founder Dominic D’Andrea describes the “plays” as 60 to 90 “heartbeats or pulses” building into a larger narrative and conversation within the local and national community. Those in residency will be scripting and choreographing based on their days directly engaging a comprehensive St. Louis population. “We meet on Wednesday, write on Thursday, rehearse on Friday, and open on Saturday,” D’Andrea explains.

University of Missouri-St. Louis theater professor Jacqueline Thompson, who has teamed up with Alick and D’Andrea to make Every 28 Hours happen, emphasizes the project’s magnitude for the region. “I can’t think of any project in the last five years where this many people came from all over the country to do work like this—it speaks to the dire needs of our time.”

read more here
http://www.stlmag.com/arts/theater/about-time-every-28-hours-unites-national-and-local-theater-artists-to-examine-ferguson-and-blacklivesmatter-/

Thursday, October 15, 2015

Staging social justice in STL

"Staging Social Justice in STL" from The St. Louis American

Every 28 Hours producer Jacqueline Thompson with St. Louis actors Tiffany Knighten, Kenyatta Tatum and Reginald Pierre perform in a social justice theatre workshop in spring of 2015.

"The Black Rep, Kathryn Bentley, That Uppity Theatre Company, The Repertory Theatre of St. Louis, Shakespeare Festival St. Louis, Salt House Collective, Mustard Seed Theatre and St. Lou Fringe will participate in the project. 

“Ferguson is the heartbeat of the movement,” Thompson said. “This project is a brilliant creative conduit to share its pulse with the world.” 

In a week-long residency, participants will tour important historical St. Louis sites and collaborate with local playwrights, directors and actors in collaborative writing sessions and readings of the plays in both St. Louis city and North County near the site of the shooting of Michael Brown Jr. The event will culminate with public performances on October 24 at the Dellwood Community Center and the Kranzberg Arts Center."


read more here 

http://www.stlamerican.com/entertainment/living_it/article_8b55fc36-72e7-11e5-959a-63a7210f7964.html?mode=image&photo=0

Thursday, October 8, 2015

Quills & Queues: 28 hours in a single minute

Quills & Queues: 28 hours in a single minute By Angela Decker for the Tidings


The “Every 28 Hours” project grew from last year’s “Ferguson Moment Project,” in which Alick and a number of theater artists around the country went to Ferguson and organized an artistic response to the events happening there. “What struck me was that the images we were seeing in the news around protests in Ferguson were literal reflections of what was happening in ‘The Great Society,’ our American Revolutions play at that time,” said Alick. The “American Revolutions” series is about our past, and this collaboration is about what is happening now, about history being made in this current Civil Rights Movement.”

Alick says she was particularly moved by the response she received from other theater artists. “One of the things I’ve found most thrilling about the project was that people immediately said yes. Regardless of whether they had the resources or the time, they felt it was important enough to make it work and participate.”

The One-Minute Play Festival is a large and long-running grassroots theater company. Under artistic director Dominic D’Andrea, the short plays are created to reflect communities and allow space for audiences to engage with social topics. So far, Alick says, this particular festival is the largest. “We have 45 playwrights participating all over the country, including Pulitzer Prize Winners, a Tony award winner and many strong, emerging playwrights,” she said.

read more here
http://www.dailytidings.com/article/20151008/NEWS/151009834

Trinity Rep to Host Every 28 Hours Launch, 10/26

Trinity Rep invites the public to a kick-off performance of the nationwide theater initiative, Every 28 Hours, on Monday, October 26, 2015. The project responds to the statistic that every 28 hours, a black person is killed by police. Following a week-long workshop in St. Louis, Missouri with playwrights from around the country, the first public reading of up to 90 one-minute plays resulting from the workshop will be held in Trinity Rep's Dowling Theater on Monday, October 26, 2015 at 7pm. The event is free and open to the public.

"When I first heard about Every 28 Hours, I knew it was a conversation I wanted to bring to Providence and Trinity Rep," says community engagement coordinator Rebecca Noon. "The activist community in Rhode Island has been present and vocal in the face of the national #blacklivesmatter movement. We need to open the city's public spaces to engage in this big conversation. Every 28 Hours promises to be one of those nights where art connects people around a life and death matter."

Resident acting company member Joe Wilson, Jr. will attend the workshop in St. Louis as a representative of Trinity Rep, and will spearhead the Trinity Rep performance. The readings will feature a wide range of local actors of all ages, races and experiences. Wilson will facilitate a conversation following the performances, sharing his experience in St. Louis, and opening the floor for a larger discussion with artists and audience.

read more here: http://www.broadwayworld.com/rhode-island/article/Trinity-Rep-to-Host-Every-28-Hours-Launch-1026-20151008

Thursday, October 1, 2015

Thought Leaders for The Every 28 Hours Plays

This project would have been impossible without the advice and support from countless contributors. We spoke with members of various law enforcement agencies who all requested anonymity. Below is a sampling of some of the people who helped us build this project. 



Thanks to Martine Green-Rodgers for her creation of our dramaturgy packet.

Thanks to Quinn McGowan of Legends Press for original artwork for our dramaturgy packet.

Thanks to Donya Washington for editing The Every 28 Hours Plays video invitation.

Thanks to everyone who provided video for our invitation.

Thanks to everyone who participated in our "This is happening" photo campaign 

Thanks to Cedric Lamar for providing the music for our invitation video.

Thanks to Mellisa Ulto for the consultation on marketing and communications. Also thanks to her for the swift and elegant design work for The Ferguson Moment site.

Thanks to Keith Jones of Soul Touchin Experiences for his insight on Ferguson, social justice activism, race and the disability community.

Thanks to Sue Ann Reed for her advice, inspiration, and support.

Thanks to Anthem Salgado of The Art of Hustle for his consultation on marketing and fundraising.

Thanks to our Communications Team volunteers for providing Facebook content and activity. 

Thanks to Toni Blackman for her consultation on arts and activism.

Thanks to Martine Green-Rodgers Lisa Q Mounte of Artistic Logistics for her consultation on collaborating remotely.

Thanks to Mark Valdez, Executive Director, Network of Ensemble Theatres for his consultation on collaboration, national impact, and Phase two structure.

Thanks to Greg Reiner, Producer -Laramie Project 10 Years Later, Tectonic Theater for his consultation on collaborating nationally

Thanks to Bonnie Metzgar, Artistic Director, American Theater Company, for her consultation on national Theater collaboration.

Thanks to Leroy F. Moore, Jr. , Founder, Krip-Hop Nation for his consultation on disability community, police violence, and activism.

Thanks to Shruti Purkayastha for her consultation on the activism community.

Thanks to Cynthia Howell of Families United for Justice for connecting some of our playwrights in DC to meet with family members who have lost loved ones to police.

Thanks to Ijeoma Oluo for her consultation on social media.

Thanks to Nissa Tzun of the Forced Trajectory Project for her consultation on families and communities affected by police

Thanks to Karen of Asian Pacific Islanders (API) for Black Lives St Louis, for her consultation on activism in Ferguson with the Asian community.

A very special Thanks to Arlene Eisen for the title of this project, dramaturgical support and social media content.

Thought Leaders for The Every 28 Hours Plays

This project would have been impossible without the advice and support from countless contributors. We spoke with members of various law enforcement agencies who all requested anonymity. Below is a sampling of some of the people who helped us build this project. 



Thanks to Martine Green-Rodgers for her creation of our dramaturgy packet.

Thanks to Quinn McGowan of Legends Press for original artwork for our dramaturgy packet.

Thanks to Donya Washington for editing The Every 28 Hours Plays video invitation.

Thanks to everyone who provided video for our invitation.

Thanks to Cedric Lamar for providing the music for our invitation video.

Thanks to Mellisa Ulto for the consultation on marketing and communications. Also thanks to her for the swift and elegant design work for The Ferguson Moment site.

Thanks to Keith Jones of Soul Touchin Experiences for his insight on Ferguson, social justice activism, race and the disability community.

Thanks to Sue Ann Reed for her advice, inspiration, and support.

Thanks to Anthem Salgado of The Art of Hustle for his consultation on marketing and fundraising.

Thanks to our Communications Team volunteers for providing Facebook content and activity. 

Thanks to Toni Blackman for her consultation on arts and activism.

Thanks to Martine Green-Rodgers Lisa Q Mounte of Artistic Logistics for her consultation on collaborating remotely.

Thanks to Mark Valdez, Executive Director, Network of Ensemble Theatres for his consultation on collaboration, national impact, and Phase two structure.

Thanks to Greg Reiner, Producer -Laramie Project 10 Years Later, Tectonic Theater for his consultation on collaborating nationally

Thanks to Bonnie Metzgar, Artistic Director, American Theater Company, for her consultation on national Theater collaboration.

Thanks to Leroy F. Moore, Jr. , Founder, Krip-Hop Nation for his consultation on disability community, police violence, and activism.

Thanks to Shruti Purkayastha for her consultation on the activism community.

Thanks to Cynthia Howell of Families United for Justice for connecting some of our playwrights in DC to meet with family members who have lost loved ones to police.

Thanks to Ijeoma Oluo for her consultation on social media.

Thanks to Nissa Tzun of the Forced Trajectory Project for her consultation on families and communities affected by police

Thanks to Karen of Asian Pacific Islanders (API) for Black Lives St Louis, for her consultation on activism in Ferguson with the Asian community.

A very special Thanks to Arlene Eisen for the title of this project, dramaturgical support and social media content.

Friday, September 25, 2015

ALL Lives Matter




Spoken Word - Video - ALL Lives Matter by Claudia Alick



Friday, September 18, 2015

URBAN THEATRE MOVEMENT

Every 28 Hours is working with theaters all over the country. We're excited to be collaborating with Urban Theatre Movement from Los Angeles, CA. Thanks to Paul Tully.

URBAN THEATRE MOVEMENT is a multicultural collective of artists dedicated to producing original and published work. We strive to create accessible art and life changing experiences through innovative theatre that serves and mirrors our rich and diverse inner-city communities. We aim to nurture, support and encourage under-served young artists in order to give them voice and hone their potential, starting at their most vulnerable stage in life. We will channel their cultural and regional roots to create a more productive and enlightened society.


http://urbantheatremovement.com/

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Rebecca Martinez

Rebecca Martinez is joining us in ST. Louis from Sojourn theater.  She is a Brooklyn-based ensemble member of Sojourn Theatre and with the company she has worked as a creator/performer, choreographer, facilitator, and teaching artist on projects including Islands of Milwaukee, Waiting for You (with the TEAM at Kansas City Rep), On the Table, and Finding Penelope. She is a co-curator of Working Theater’s Directors Salon, Associate Artistic Director of Hybrid Theatre Works, a member of the Lincoln Center Theater Directors Lab and of INTAR’s Unit52. She has worked with Miracle Theatre, Artists Repertory Theatre, Oregon Children’s Theatre, Portland Playhouse (Portland, OR), the 52nd Street Project, Brave New World Repertory Theatre, One Minute Play Festival, and in developmental works for companies such as the Lark and Cherry Lane (NYC). Awards include four Portland Theater Drammys (for Ensemble Acting & Choreography) and the Lilla Jewel Award for Women Artists.

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Sojourn Theater

Every 28 Hours is working with theaters all over the country. We're excited to be collaborating with Sojourn Theatre from Chicago, IL. Thanks to Michael Rohd for his help.


Sojourn Theatre, founded in 1999, is an award-winning ensemble theatre company comprised of 15 artists who live in 8 cities and make performance together around the nation. National/international touring, a body of 25 works, and a reputation for consistent innovation as artists and engagement practitioners has led to: a 2005 Ford Foundation/Americans for the Arts Exemplar Award; being featured regularly at conferences and universities nationwide as a "best practice model" for arts-based civic dialogue; being featured in recent articles in American Theater Magazine and Yale’s Theater Journal; partnerships with non-arts sector organizations such as city and state legislative bodies, social service agencies and cross-disciplinary arts centers around the country. Current projects include a national initiative in multiple US Cities with Catholic Charities USA poverty reduction sites; adapting our project BUILT with Planning Commissions around the country as a tool for Public Engagement; Islands of Milwaukee, a multi-year collaboration engaging public health, public transit and care services for homebound seniors around performance-making and public dialogue culminating in an interactive exhibit at City Hall in Fall 2014; How To End Poverty in 90 Minutes, a devised and participatory performance model for community engagement being staged (so far) in Chicago, Louisiana and Washington, DC. The company is led by founding artistic director Michael Rohd who devises, directs and collaborates on cross-sector projects around the nation, is on faculty at Northwestern University, wrote the widely translated book Theatre for Community, Conflict, and Dialogue, and leads the Center for Performance and Civic Practice.

http://www.sojourntheatre.org/

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Katie Christie

Katie Christie Founder & Artistic Director, Voices United is supporting this phase of work in St. Louis. Voices United, formerly Peace Child Miami, was created in 1989 by 17 year old Katie Christie, a high school senior at Miami’s New World School of the Arts. After traveling to the Soviet Union for a Peace Child arts exchange program, Christie noticed that young people of different races and cultures did not get along or respect each other’s differences. She also felt that young people faced a multitude of problems without any way to address their concerns. To respond to these challenges, Christie created Voices United to give the young people of Miami a voice. The impact of that voice has been tremendous: over 800 youth from the Miami area have participated in performances seen by 20,000 people, bringing to light the concerns of today’s youth. Katie Christie-Bereng is also Director of School Age Program at the YWCA of Asheville.

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Tarell Alvin McCraney

McCraney was born and raised in Liberty City, the inner city area of Miami, Florida. He graduated from the New World School of the Arts High School, with the Exemplary Artist Award and the Dean Award in Theater in 1999, matriculated into the Theater School at DePaul University in Chicago graduating with the Sarah Siddons Award and a BFA in Acting 2003. He attended the British American Drama Academy (BADA) Mid-Summer at Oxford, studying Shakespeare with master actors and teachers from the Royal Shakespeare Company and around the UK. His Masters Degree in Fine Art is from the Yale School of Drama in playwriting 2007; he received the Cole Porter Award upon graduating. In 2013 he was the recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship "Genius Grant." He is a member of New Dramatists and Teo Castellanos/D-Projects in Miami. In April 2010, McCraney became the 43rd member of the Steppenwolf Theatre Ensemble.

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Florinda Bryant

Florinda Bryant is joining us in St. Louis from Salvage Vanguard Theater. She is an interdisciplinary artist and educator. She has worked with Creative Action since 2005 and has been working with at-risk youth for over ten years. She is the Artistic Director of the Austin Project Performance Company, supported by the Center for African and African Americans Studies Department at the University of Texas. She directed and performed in the Artspark Festival 2008, award winning play “HUSH” and starred in the world premiere of Sharon Bridgforth’s new work delta dandi.

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Jake Margolin

Jake Margolin is joining us a gust artists in St. Louis from The Team. He has co-written and/or performed in five TEAM plays: RoosevElvis, Mission Drift, Waiting for You, Architecting, and Particularly in the Heartland. With his husband Nick Vaughan he makes interdisciplinary visual art. In 2014 Nick & Jake moved to Houston, Texas to research and develop a series of installations about 19th century LGBTQ histories from Texas and the surrounding states. Nick & Jake maintain collaborations with choreographers Faye Driscoll and Yoshiko Chuma. Their website is www.nickandjakestudio.com



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Joe Wilson Jr

JOE WILSON, JR. is joining us as a guest artists in St. Louis from Trinity Rep Theater. As an acting company member for this his 10th season, Joe’s roles have included Jim Casey (The Grapes of Wrath), George (Intimate Apparel), Gavin Ring-Mayne (House and Garden), Duke of Albany (King Lear), Bernard (Boeing Boeing), Antonio (Merchant of Venice), Albert and Kevin (Clybourne Park), Lancelot (Camelot), Eugene (Yellow- man), Emcee (Cabaret), Clarence (It’s a Wonderful Life), Orsino (Twelfth Night), Vinnie (The Odd Couple), Walter Lee (A Raisin in the Sun), Scrooge (A Christmas Carol), Sam (Paris by Night), Willie Stark (All the King’s Men), El Gallo (The Fantasticks), Lopakin (Cherry Orchard), Topdog/Underdog, Andre (Ain’t Misbehavin’), and Horatio (Hamlet).

Joe has appeared on Broadway in the 2000 Tony Award Nominated Jesus Christ Superstar and Off Broadway in the critically acclaimed Little Ham and Josephine’s Song. He has also appeared at The Dallas Theater Center, North Shore Music Theatre, Alliance Theater, McCarter Theater, Syracuse Stage, Guthrie Theater, Ordway Music Theater, Children’s Theatre Co.(Acting Company Member), American Players Theatre, Penumbra Theatre, and New Rep. Theater.

Joe has a BA in Political Science from the University of Notre Dame, and an MFA in Acting from the University of Minnesota/Guthrie Theatre. He is the recipient of the 2014 Volunteer of the Year Award from the Manton Avenue Project in the Olneyville neighborhood of Providence, RI for recognition of his contributions as a guest artist, teacher and board member. In addition, he is the recipient of the Siseretta Jones Award for Cultural Literacy and the Arts, 2012 from the Rhode Island Black Heritage Society awarded to excellency in the arts (acting) presented “in recognition of those who have made outstanding contributions to the African American Community of Rhode Island.” He was also a Featured Artist in “Black Lavender,” Brown University, Providence, RI 2009-2010: an exhibit curated by Robb Dimmick and sponsored by the Rhode Island Council for Humanities, highlighting the historical contributions of black gay men in Rhode Island. Joe is a native of New Orleans, LA and is a proud member of the Actor’s Equity Association and SAG/AFTRA.

Joe Wilson, Jr. and Trinity Repertory Company are participants in the Fox Foundation Resident Actor Fellowships, funded by the William & Eva Fox Foundation and administered by Theatre Communications Group.

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Thursday, September 17, 2015

Salt House Collective

Every 28 Hours is working with theaters all over the country. We're excited to be collaborating with Salt House Collective from St. Louis.
Founded by Co artistic directors, Jamie McKittrick and Matthew R. Kerns The Salt House Collective is a post-dramatic performance collective based in St. Louis, Missouri.

SHC creates new works.  Based in performance and installation SHC challenges traditional structural aesthetics associated with the living and visual arts.

Artist driven.
Evocative.
Engaged.
Experiential.
Performance.



http://www.salthousecollective.com/


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Kathryn Bentley

Kathryn Bentley, part of the St. Louis producing team, is an actress, educator, playwright, director, and community activist. She has a long resume of roles (including “All My Children”) as well as significant experience working within communities through Harlem’s Blackberry Productions and CHIPS in Motion for Teens in St. Louis. She has also done research in Suriname with the indigenous Du Theatre to write and produce a production there. Currently, Bentley is an Associate Professor of Theater Performance at Southern Illinois University-Edwardsville.


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Professor Kathryn Bentley Brings Community to Theater

5 Performance Removes Veil on Exploitation, Racism

Black Theater Workshop Explores Trayvon Martin Case

http://www.thetelegraph.com/article/20150218/news/302189945 

Ten St.Louis-­‐area Artists Awarded $20,000 RAC Fellowship 


Marty Casey

Marty Casey, part of the Every 28 hours St. Louis producing team, began her career over 15 years ago as a National Touring Actress. Marty has been a proud member of the Actors Equity Association, since 2006. She has toured with many productions nationwide. Casey has also toured Germany and France singing with the popular Gospel group, The Golden Gospel Singers. She has been awarded and recognized for her unique and creative style as an Actress and Writer. Her credits include; The Last of the Red Hot Momma’s, Actress; Molly, P.H.A.T. Girls Don’t Cry, Writer/Director/Producer; A House Divided, Writer/Director/Producer; Menopause the Musical, Actress; Power Woman; Lord Knows I’ve Tried, Writer/Director/ Producer; Looking for Mr. Do Right, Actress; Loletha ; Be Careful What U Pray 4, Actress; Mother Lucille. Marty’s television appearances include; Don’t Forget The Lyrics, The Oprah Winfrey Show, and The Price is Right. Marty is very excited to be casted for SITS. The Winter’s Tale; Paulina. Marty would like to dedicate her performances to her beloved grandson, Mason E. High.




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Andrea Purnell

Andrea Purnell, Part of the Every 28 Hours producing team, serves as the Communications and Artistic Director at the Missouri Institute of Mental Health (MIMH) at UMSL. On behalf of MIMH, she uses her background in the arts to educate the community on matters related to mental health. In addition to her public relations duties at MIMH, Andrea is an actress, writer, director and stage manager, who combines her creative gifts with her concern for mental health care to great efficacy. Her acting credits include theater, commercials, industrial films, and movies. Among her writing credits is the play “Depression, Whose Disease Is It Anyway,” which she produced for the stage as part of a performing arts program designed to match the actor and the mental health professional in addressing mental illness.

http://stlcurator.com/missouri-institute-of-mental-health-andrea-purnell/







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The Working Theater

Every 28 Hours is working with theaters all over the country. We're excited to be collaborating with The Working Theater from New York, NY.



Great theater strives to tell stories that illuminate, challenge and alter our perceptions, that show us who we are and transform us in the process. Working Theater believes this transformative experience should not be a privilege or a luxury, but a staple. We recognize that we live in a society that is often polarized by economic, cultural and class differences and that these differences can be divisive. However, what makes us different is sometimes the most interesting thing about us.

We want working people, Americans working in the industrial and service economies, who may be unable to afford commercial theater prices or feel that it does not resonate with their lives and experience, to make play-going a regular part of their cultural lives.

Toward that goal, we offer low ticket prices and tell stories that reflect a diverse population of the working majority, that acknowledge their complexity and oft-denied power in an increasingly complex world, which we hope will unite us in our common humanity.

http://www.theworkingtheater.org 





Saturday, August 15, 2015

Ping Chong Company

Every 28 Hours is working with theaters all over the country. We're excited to be collaborating with Ping Chong + Company from New York, NY.

Ping Chong + Company produces theatrical works addressing the important cultural and civic issues of our times, striving to reach the widest audiences with the greatest level of artistic innovation and social integrity. The company was founded in 1975 by leading theatrical innovator Ping Chong with a mission to create works of theater and art that explore the intersections of race, culture, history, art, media and technology in the modern world. Today, Ping Chong + Company produces original works by a close-knit ensemble of affiliated artists, under the artistic leadership of Ping Chong. Productions range from intimate oral history projects to grand scale cinematic multidisciplinary productions featuring puppets, performers, and full music and projection scores. The art reveals beauty, precision, and a commitment to social justice.

www.pingchong.org/




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Voices United

Every 28 Hours is working with theaters all over the country. We're excited to be collaborating with Voices United from Miami, FL.

Voices United is a non-profit organization that fosters cross-cultural understanding and youth action through creative expression, empowering our youth to become tolerant and caring leaders for a better future. Voices United empowers multi-cultural youth to transform hatred into understanding, prejudice into respect, violence into peaceful collaboration, and cynicism into hope.

Voices United, formerly Peace Child Miami, was created in 1989 by 17 year old Katie Christie, a high school senior at Miami’s New World School of the Arts. After traveling to the Soviet Union for a Peace Child arts exchange program, Christie noticed that young people of different races and cultures did not get along or respect each other’s differences.

She also felt that young people faced a multitude of problems without any way to address their concerns. To respond to these challenges, Christie created Voices United to give the young people of Miami a voice. The impact of that voice has been tremendous: over 800 youth from the Miami area have participated in performances seen by 20,000 people, bringing to light the concerns of today’s youth.

http://voicesunited.org/voicesunited/



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Steppenwolf Theater Company

Every 28 Hours is working with theaters all over the country. We're excited to be collaborating with Steppenwolf Theater Company from Chicago, IL. Thanks to Gretta Honold.



The Steppenwolf ensemble first began performing in the mid-1970s in the basement of a Highland Park, IL church, the ambitious brainchild of three high school and college friends: Jeff Perry, Terry Kinney and Gary Sinise. Fast forward some 35 years and counting and the Steppenwolf Theatre Company has become the nation’s premier ensemble theater—redefining the landscape of acting and performance. The ensemble has grown to 44 members who represent a remarkable generation of actors, directors and playwrights. Thrilling, powerful, groundbreaking productions from Balm in Gilead and Grapes of Wrath to August: Osage County—and accolades that included the National Medal of Arts and twelve Tony® Awards—have made the theater legendary. Steppenwolf’s artistic force remains rooted in the original vision of its founders: an artist-driven theater, whose vitality is defined by its sharp appetite for groundbreaking, innovative work.

Steppenwolf operates as a not-for-profit organization relying on community support to produce or presents up to 16 plays and nearly 700 performances, readings and other events every year on our three stages. The theater’s artistic and educational programs draw a multi-generational audience of nearly 200,000 from the greater metropolitan Chicago area, while our impact reaches well beyond this region with productions that tour nationally and internationally.

https://www.steppenwolf.org/


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Friday, August 14, 2015

Salvage Vanguard Theater

Every 28 Hours is working with theaters all over the country. We're excited to be collaborating with Salvage Vanguard Theater from Austin, TX. Thanks to Jenny Larson.



Salvage Vanguard Theater is a nonprofit arts organization located in Austin, Texas, committed to fostering a dynamic exchange between visionary artists and audiences new to their work. To that end, Salvage Vanguard Theater seeks to combine explosive energy with expert technique, creating forms that defy tradition and define new American theater. We are a hub for Austin artists, audiences, and arts organizations, SVT creates and presents transformative high-quality artistic experiences that foster experimentation and conversation.