Every 28 Hours One-Minute Play Festival

Phase One Oct 20-24, St. Louis County

A Real Life Superhero

Bree Newsome became an Internet and media sensation when she did what many were longing to do but didn’t dare. She scaled a flagpole outside South Carolina's statehouse and brought the flag down, while police officers waited to arrest her below.

Every 28 Hours One-Minute Play Festival

Coming soon across the nation! Oct 20-24!

What is The Ferguson Moment?

We call on artists across the nation to share their responses to the oppression, violence, and resistance to racially motivated police brutality

Resources

Marcia Chatelain, an assistant professor in the Department of History, created the #FergusonSyllabus in response to recent events in Ferguson, Missouri.

Saturday, January 2, 2016

Our Life: The Black Youth Stories

"Hey everyone! Just a reminder that Our Life: The Black Youth Stories Project is going up this weekend in Boyle Heights, Los Angeles. If you're in the area and want to see a show that talks about blackness in America based on actual nationwide accounts, get your tickets here. Use discount code JUSTICE4 to save. Remember too that there's a talkback after each performance. Not required, but the conversation is important. Hope to see some of you there." Ross Jackson



Our Life: The Black Youth Stories is a production of narratives that focuses on the experience of black youths, past and present, forced to view their blackness as limitation and the lasting effects these limitations create. Our intent is to develop a performance piece that creates a conversation about the current climate of black America, compares it to the conditions of the past, and fosters dialogue on how we can begin to navigate the continuing adversity. There will be talkbacks held after each performance to allow an open forum during which audience members may express their thoughts about the issues at hand as well as the production's process and message.

Buy tickets here: http://ourlifebysp.bpt.me/

Wednesday, December 30, 2015

125th and Freedom

Artistic Call to Action at Judson Memorial Church



125th and Freedom is a durational, processional, performance ritual that explores the intersection of prison system, displacement, and environmental racism. Additionally, the piece re-imagines historic 125th street as Harriet Tubman's Underground Railroad to a world with out the systemic mass incarceration or the extermination of black and brown people, globally.

The ensemble consists of: Kimani Fowlin, Audrey Hailes, David J. Cork, Jason C. Brown, and Donnell E. Smith.

Original writing by: Aurin Squire and Ebony Noelle Golden
Choreography and Direction by: Ebony Noelle Golden

Tuesday, December 29, 2015

THEHYPEISDEAD - TO THE LOST SOULS OF 2015

No charges for Sandra Bland's death, no charges for Tamir Rice's death?
'To the lost souls of 2015' Art by @thehypeisdead via Ferguson in Paris ‪#‎BlackLivesMatter‬


Photographer/Painter: TheHypeIsDead
Model: Millie G

VIA--> http://www.afropunk.com/photo/thehypeisdead-to-the-lost-souls-of-2015

Why are there no staff black cartoonists at a time when we need them most?


"Knight has been drawing comics about police brutality and bias for nearly a quarter-century, since the 1992 Rodney King riots, and as the visual commentator likes to note, he was spoofing the racism he witnessed well before he began lampooning presidents. But in some ways, it is only more recently than some audiences have truly caught up to Knight and the realities he renders in his new cartoon slide show, “They Shoot Black People, Don’t They?” Given the coverage that police shootings from Los Angeles to Ferguson to Cleveland to the Carolinas now garner in a world of smartphone cameras and social media, many readers laugh at Knight’s cartoons because they are finally fully cognizant of the context — and because they realize that his satiric bull’s-eyes are painted uncomfortably close to the truth." 
 By Michael Cavna December 29, 2015

Read More here: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/comic-riffs/wp/2015/12/29/in-a-tamir-rice-era-why-are-there-no-staff-black-cartoonists-to-comment/